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Posted on July 15 2022

Immigration to Canada breaks all records in the first five months of 2022

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By  Editor
Updated November 22 2023

Highlights:

  • By May 2022, Canada has welcomed 187,490 immigrants through Canada PR
  • Canada plans to invite 451,000 permanent residents by 2024
  • Provincial and Territorial heads ask for more power for international students recruitment and the PNP process

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wuyEp9PgEGQ Abstract: Canada witnessed a record-breaking increase in immigrants receiving PR. According to IRCC or Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship Canada, the rate of immigration to Canada rose in the first five months of 2022. It had a 71.8% spike in granting Canada PR or permanent residency compared to the same period last year in 2021. By May of the current year, Canada had invited 187,490 new immigrants for PR. The figure is more by 78,370 compared to what it was during the first five months of 2021. *Check your eligibility to Canada through Canada Immigration Points Calculator. Immigration Rate in Canada If the current rate of immigration continues, Canada expects to invite 449,976 new permanent residents in 2022. It is more than the previous figure of 431,645 set by Ottawa. The rate of immigration currently is so high that it would lead Canada to break the 2023 immigration target of 447,055 PR visa for individuals who migrate to Canada through the Immigration Levels Plan for 2022 to 2024. The plan aims to invite grant 451,000 permanent residents to Canada in 2024. The Canadian business leaders are asking territorial and provincial to demand more skilled immigrant workers to address labor shortages in the country. Read more... Have plans to study in Canada? Here’s a guide to the costs involved Unemployment drops to record low in Canada, total employment increased by 1.1 million – May Report How much do you know about Canada immigration under FSWP? Canadian Premiers Seek More Power in International Student Recruitment and PNPs The premiers of all the Canadian provinces and territories issued a joint statement stating to the federal government to give them more power in the recruitment of international students and immigrant workers through the PNP or Provincial Nominee Programs. To retain the international students graduating, the premiers asked the federal government to remove any policies that stop international students from accessing the support of federal employment programs. The territories and provinces optimize the PGWP or Post-Graduate Work Permit for international students to address the local workforce requirements and transition to permanent residents of Canada. *Wish to study in Canada? Y-Axis is here to assist you. Shortage in Workforce in Canada A report by the Business Council of Canada titled 'Canada's Immigration Advantage: A Survey of Major Employers' highlights the grave concern of the lack of skilled workers to in Canada. Around 80% of the employers participating in the survey said that they were facing trouble finding skilled workers. Shortages in the labor force exist in every territory and province. But, it is more prominent in Quebec, Ontario, and British Columbia. Canadian employers are struggling to find workers for technical roles. There is a shortage of professionals in fields like engineering, computer science, and information technology. Do you wish to migrate to Canada? Contact Y-Axis, the leading Overseas immigration Consultant in the UAE. If you found this news article helpful, you may want to read… 80% of Canadian employers seek better immigration to fill jobs in Canada

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